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Call Us: + 353 (01) 7076011

isrg logo vds certification logo essa certification logo a2p certification logo

Call Us: + 353 (01) 7076011

  • About Us
  • Contact Us
  • Guide To European Certification
  • Insurance Rates (ISRG)
  • Help For Insurers
  • Advice Videos
  • Lock Videos
  • Testimonials
  • Blog

The Danger Of Air Tube Cash Transfer Directly To A Safe

 The Vacuum Gang

It is amazing that some suppliers will still claim safes fitted with pneumatic cash tubes can have a cash rating based on accredited burglary resistance certification. 

In 2010, Paris Police were on the hunt for at least two men who were believed to be responsible for stealing thousands of Euro using nothing more than a domestic vacuum. A series of robberies took place at French Monoprix grocery stores which used a pneumatic tube system to deliver capsules of cash to the store's safe. 

The thieves had realised that the 65mm hole cut into the safe to accommodate the pneumatic tube was a specific weakness to the system which made bypassing security a simple matter. The men would disable the stores alarm and enter after hours wearing ski masks, then locate the safe and disengage the pneumatic tube. They would then use the 65mm hole in the safe to suck capsules of money directly out. With no leads and no information on who the robbers were, police had no way to track down the thieves the press had quickly dubbed the “vacuum gang.”  As of 2011, the vacuum gang had successfully stolen almost €700,000 in fifteen night-time heists, leaving only a few CCTV recordings of masked men for evidence. 

In 2016 I tried removing cash capsules from a supermarket safe fitted with an “anti-fishing baffle” using a long piece of hose, a weight, a small funnel, and a home vacuum. The funnel ensured the capsules would be gripped at either end, the change in suction indicating when a capsule had been grasped. A more powerful vacuum would have made things move a lot quicker but the principle was demonstrated.   

Remember, EN1143-2 is the European burglary resistance standard for deposit safes, and this standard will never appear on a safe fitted with a pneumatic tube. A deposit safe that displays this certification or the standard EN1143-1 is a modified unit and its certification is considered void due to the barrier material of the unit having been extensively breached.

Be informed, know the risks, protect your business. 

In Europe a properly certified deposit safe should always display a certification badge to standard EN1143-2. This badge means that both the safe and the deposit system have been tested in an accredited laboratory against attack and manipulation and the result of that testing has been verified by an independent accredited European certification body.


 


 For advice call: +353 1 7076011


Certified Safes Ireland™ in-house advisor on keeping jewellery, watch collections, goods, cash, documents and data, safe, secure, yet readily accessible, is Alan Donohoe Redd.

Alan Redd Certified Safes Ireland NSAI

Alan Donohoe Redd is a member of the European Committee for Standardisation (CEN) Working Group responsible for writing European Standards for safes, strongrooms (vaults), secure cabinets and physical data protection for the European Union and a member of the U.S. Underwriters Laboratories (UL) Standards Technical Panel TC72 covering standards for fire resistance of record protection devices. Alan is also a registered NATO supplier and a longstanding member of the European Security Systems Association. Alan has a vast range of experience spanning almost 40 years encompassing installation of safes, strongrooms, physical data protection, CCTV, alarms, access control, secure storage control systems and Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility (SCIF) specification, design and installation. 

An expert on standards and fraud issues related to secure storage in Europe, the UK and the use of asbestos in European safe and cabinet manufacturing, Alan has had articles related to these subjects published by The Law Society Gazette and Irish Broker Magazine, has forced retractions of multiple false claims related to secure storage offerings to the public and has been pivotal in having misleading standards and practices recognised and withdrawn in Ireland, the UK and at a European level.

Alan's seminars on safes, strongrooms and high net worth secure storage have been part of Continuing Professional Development for underwriters and insurers having been awarded CPD points by the Insurance Institute of Ireland and the Chartered Insurance Institute (UK).

Insurance Institute of Ireland Insurance Institute of London nato cage code

 Alan's expertise has been relied on by:

N.A.T.O. Europe, The U.S. Air Force (Europe), The National Treasury Management Agency (Ireland), The Department Of Communications (NCSC Cyber Security) (Ireland), The Revenue Commissioners, Electricity Supply Board (Cyber Security) (Ireland), The Danish Defence Forces (Afghanistan), PayPal (Worldwide), Grant Thornton, The Insurance Institute of Ireland, The Royal College Of Surgeons, BFC Bank, Interxion Data Centres, The Private Security Authority, Isle of Man Gold Bullion, Brown Thomas, Bvlgari, Boodles, Druids Glen, The Shelbourne Hotel, and many others ....